Commission order process with ArtCorgi

Recently, I’ve had 2 commission art orders via ArtCorgi. <– My referral link.

artcorgi_homepage

If you’ve never heard of them much, that’s because they’ve recently launched this year. The idea behind it is to gather a network of artists together to do non-commercial and personal usage artwork, and it takes out the problem of finding someone who isn’t available. One of the biggest things the founders had problems with is finding artists who were still active in doing commissions. The style ranges are quite wide and price ranges range from $20-$100 and for highly detailed works go above $100.

So I’m pretty much in the network, and you can find me here. I’ve had the pleasure of completing two recent chibi avatars of Linda and her daughter, Alison.

My background: I started off doing these for myself, I only started doing it more often last year after I had shaved off half of my head some time in the summer of 2012. My mom didn’t like it when I came home like that in the beginning of 2013, so… to stop her annoying nagging, I grew out my hair. But I wanted to record the styles that I was going through with my hair, because having half your head being completely unsymmetrical was sort of hard to style sometimes — I wore my hair like a badge though. I think only eccentric, crazy, artsy girls like me do that — and it was definitely not because I was listening to Skrillex; I only began listening to dubstep after the fact. And then started doing some avatars for a few friends. I’ve actually been doing stylized portraits for awhile now. My beginnings with selling this though, started with Fiver.com, but then I realized, that $4 (customers pay $5, but $1 goes into Fiver, and the $4 goes to you) was not feasible. Especially when a typical caricature costs $20 on average from a street vendor. Maybe if I drew it in 15 minutes, but oftentimes, the terms and conditions required that the seller offer revisions. So that normally drives up the minutes, because you have to put in extra time to make revisions. I usually put in a good amount of effort. So takes me time to assess first, the reference photos and then personality. I’ve since moved on and have found out that sort of website is not for me because of the amount of work I put in and the quality that people got didn’t really translate into $5 so it didn’t make sense to stay. And then ArtCorgi found me, and I was very happy.

If you’re curious on how the process is like, it starts off like this:

1) Someone finds me on ArtCorgi because they like my style. They upload the references, and provide important details. In this case, the chibis need a quick personality bio. What kind of person are you? Upbeat, friendly, angry, shy? Etc… Reference photos need to have a full frontal head shot, side shots and 3/4 quarter views, and a full body shot. Also, important to include the type of clothing you’ll be wearing in your photos. I’m not your fashion stylist, unless you pay me and tell me that I am. Plus, clothing that we wear communicates another piece of personality, so I always ask if its not provided, otherwise, I assume its what is worn in the photos I’m given. However, I don’t mind someone telling me they want their head put on top of a manticore’s body. I’m just doing my job. Lol.

2) The email comes in, and Simone, the site admin and intermediary, gives me a basic rundown and expected deadline and other details, yada yada yada.

3) After reading the email, taking notes, and looking over the references, I set up my workspace. Always need 2 monitors. I put up all the references onto 1 monitor, and the main monitor with Photoshop up. As I would like to show a set up of this, but I don’t really want to have my clients photos uploaded online without their consent. But here is an example of what it may look like:

monitorworkspace

So many windows… Music is hidden…

4) Sketching begins.

linda_avatar_linesketch_weblinda_avatar_sketch_web

5) After sketching is complete, I send over what I got to Simone and Linda for feedback.

6) I get feedback. Mostly all right, the client says it looks like her, just need more blush, hair color, details in shoes, and minor body adjustments. Hair color was actually just a dark shade of blonde, but better to let me know first. The sketch phase here does not include the little details quite yet so don’t be scared, this is not the final outcome if you actually studied my style of art. I’m more of the sketchy inbetween artist — I do not waste time rendering in the beginning stages until I am sure the client tells me the sketch outline is good to go. My WIP almost always never turns out the like the final during reviewing.

7) Process. If you’re curious, I always put the first sketch into a 21% opacity, and draw new cleaner outline on top. But I like to keep the sketch underneath for added tones.

linda_avatar_process1_weblinda_avatar_process3_web

linda_avatar_process5_web

Building up midtones.

linda_avatar_process6_web

More details to face.

linda_avatar_process8_web

Added highlights.

linda_avatar_process9_web

Flower created with pen tool, with two shades of purple.

linda_avatar_process10_web

Created white outline swirls, and set to 68%.

 

linda_avatar_web

Final results.

Here is another one with Alison the Bluebelle Fairy:

 

Final: alison_bluebellefairy_web

Closeup: alison_bluebellefairy_closeup

 

Interested in getting this commission? Please use my referral link: http://artcorgi.com?referral=23 and find Tannie Duong. 🙂

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Filed under Art, Commission, illustration, Painting, sketches

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