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Shinhan Premium Watercolors test

Hello!

Finally got around to testing out the tubes of Shinhan premium water color.

A little bit about Shinhan water colors:

ShinHan Water Colors exhibit strong transparency and brilliance. The uniform spread of our water colors leaves no hard lines at the edges of washes. Designed with accurate formulas, ShinHan Water Colors have excellent intermixing and overlapping properties that allow artists to work with a wide range of techniques.

ShinHanArt provides three major Water Color lines ­ PWC, Extra Fine Artists Water Color, Artists’ Water Color and SHAMI Water Color.

PWC, Extra Fine Artists Water Color
PWC, Extra Fine Artists Water Color is crafted with the highest quality pigments and the finest high-grade gum Arabic. To enhance
the clarity and depth of color, single-pigments have been used whenever possible and the usage of mixed pigments has been limited.
Using single-pigments, water colors are less prone to fading and the consistency of colors are improved. PWC offers exceptional clarity and transparency that artists desire, along with superior lightfastness to resist fading. PWC is ideal for spread techniques and color overlapping, bringing out the best in water color paper. The color palette offers a total of 84 colors that are transparent and subtle, yet intense and
vibrant, allowing for an even greater freedom of expression.

  • 84 very pure and exuberant colors
  • Carefully selected, fine pigments
  • High-grade gum Arabic vehicle
  • Highest degree of lightfastness
  • Maximum degree of transparency
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15 mL tubes

They’re a Korean based company, and they’re specialty is color luminosity, and quality paint products. They also have a line of markers called Touch markers, which is pretty much similar to Copic — I will be doing a review of this later also.

Here’s a test page. So basically, I was testing to see the luminosity and opacity/transparency. The paper I used is Arches Natural White, Cold Press, 140lb. Overall, I’ve found them to be quite transparent able to retain good luminosity on the white of the paper. The only other test is time, which is lightfastness, but that’s really something I’m going to put off doing. But as I visited their booth at Comic Con, I met Mrs. Han, who showed me a demo of the markers, a picture from a couple of years ago – maybe 5 years? She’ll have to correct me on that… I can’t remember! 😛 — well, least to say, the colors in the markers remained the same. I think its safe to assume their watercolors, being professional quality is exactly the same.

Shinhan watercolor test page

So the top ones are the Shinhan paints. I really can’t do a color comparison it feels like, because sometimes there are so many pigment names and color variations, each company names them differently; there’s no one unified name. And sometimes one red can be totally different from another red. It really comes down to what pigments each company uses. But I picked colors to compare that best matched as much as possible. On the left side, I tested what they looked like charged together, and then when you add alcohol to it.

I think these are pretty bright paints. I can definitely see that my Reeves Pthalo Blue is the most opaque, because it shows up on top of the black line. But the rest of the other paints are rather transparent over the black line (which is India Ink). And then the Van Gogh Permanent Blue Violet is the next most opaque. This one matched with the Shinhan Permanent Violet, is a lot more blue-ish in hue. Although all the Shinhan paints were really hard to scrub out of the paper after applying a lot of water, it could just be that most of the time, cool pigments tend to stick much more. So these pigments are quite permanent, as in the paints didn’t wash off so easily; the blue was the least difficult to lift off. And the not sure because of the brand, Reeves, but the Pthalo Blue lifted off really easily. So, but this brand is normally really easy to lift off… I like it for when I’m starting out a painting and can apply colors on top gradually. (As you are painting in watercolor, the opposite method of painting versus oil applies — you paint from lights to darks. But with oil colors, you paint from darks to lights.) I know the manganese Blue by Windsor isn’t as dark as Peacock Blue, but they were similar in hue so I just put it next.

I did this chart back in 2009 and probably need to update it again, as I have much more paint colors now and want to swap out for my better quality stuff. But normally, this is similar to what I did up there. I just wasn’t as thorough — I didn’t test how each of the other paints would react when mixed together — but that is for another free weekend.

1_1_colorchart_tduong

 

I also tested them alongside colors that I all ready own. So the best watercolor brands I had before this, currently is Windsor and Van Gogh. I started off with Reeves and Grumbacher – these were hand-me-downs from my sister’s bestie, so she was a designer, but she didn’t need them anymore. So lucky me, I got to inherit them along with some other nifty art supplies. But they didn’t really give me particularly rich colors, I started off with using them in the class room. And have since added more to my collection, so I’m happy I got these Shinhan pwc’s to add to it also. 🙂

Here is a video demo of me painting with the three colors:

Finished painting:

hydrangea_painting_tannieduong_web

I made the mistake of adding too much alcohol and that made me unable to lift off anymore of the watercolors… so I had to add white back in with white paint. I did extra touch ups with the white paint after the video as well.

I think overall, I’m very impressed with the colors, really nice and really saturated. I hope they’re products get a little more attention. If you’re trying to find a retailer for the paints, DickBlick’s online store and Jerry’s Artarama online store also sells it. As for finding the retail location, you may have to get in touch with Steven Berman at steven.berman@shinhanart.com and I think he’ll give you more info.

Hope this review was helpful! I hope I’m not missing anything else that people might be curious about, if so, please don’t hesitate to leave a comment. Thanks for reading. :>

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Filed under Reviews, Watercolor

Starcraft 2: Wings of Liberty Artbook

Artbook review time!

I don’t remember if I have ever made a post about the Starcraft 2 art book I had before, but now I am because I just beat the first expansion of the Starcraft 2 game series. Honestly, I did not appreciate it as much as I do now. I bought it because I found it on Ebay for a really good deal. And I always thought the artwork Blizzard produces has been some of my most inspirational and contemporary influences. I even have a very old Warcraft artbook from the first games, and you can see how much Blizzard has improved since.

There is a lot of irony in all this simply because back last November when I had gone to CTN Expo, I met a really cool artist there and he told me NOT to play games. Like, I’ve been told this countless of times, but actually, I didn’t listen. It’s not because I don’t value their opinions. I really didn’t plan to play. They told me that there are videos online that you could watch on youtube that has other people playing. However, sometimes, I get these urges that don’t go away till they are satisfied. I blame it on my genes because I think that my family may have addiction problems? And these are my addictions…? hahaha… I actually did stop playing a lot of games, and I only began to play again after graduating from college. I didn’t own any of the new game consoles, and I almost feel ridiculous saying this to a gamer as much as I hate telling bacon lovers or anyone that I hate bacon. (I know, I can hear the gasps from all around even through space.) Can’t really be called a gamer anymore if one stops playing??  There was one occasion a good friend of mine lent me his DS to play The World Ends With You, which is an all around fun and very interesting fun game to play! The mechanics on that is pretty neat not to mention good music. And I love good music!

But overall, I feel like I should start understanding games again, because I am too out-of-touch with the current games now. Like, what does a gamer actually look for when they play a game anyway? Maybe this is a bad thing that I think too much. I analyze too much. But actually, I would rather work for a company that thinks about its consumers a little more instead of creating stupid games that are just all design and no content. This is almost all too apparent. I appreciate good design, but I’d rather it have some quality in other areas too. But it also goes a lot to say, that at least companies know how to market and so they invest in good designers.

Also, a side note. I finally got a taste of Far Cry 3 and its really interesting..!

In essence, though, as I flipped through the book, I had a revelation, that although this book may have a lot of artwork — it is completely filled, front and back with art, this is probably only a quarter of the art they had to produce. Why? Well, as I played this game, there were so  many units to memorize, so many building constructions to remember to build (not to mention, you need to remember what comes out of those constructions), and there are upgrades for almost a lot of those units and constructs. Plenty of characters, we all know Jim Raynor and Sarah Kerrigan, and new additions like Tychus — who is helping me develop a southern accent, Arcturus, etc. Concept art for those guys!

The comments inside the book did say that the main focus of this first expansion was the Terrans. So there was more Terran art than there was Protoss or Zerg. I have yet to play the second expansion of this game, but I can only imagine the main focus of the next two games are going to be about each of the other two races. I’m guessing, but I need to play the next ones, ey?

My appreciation comes from the fact that since I now know these units better, such as what their role in the game is, the artwork makes more sense to me. The book itself has very little captions for all the pieces in here, in fact, it only gets wordy at the very beginning with the ‘foreword’ and introduction. Concept art is not about pretty art like regular fine art. Concept art is a solution to a question. What is this thing’s purpose? How does it function, and how does it serve the story? One should always ask this when one decides to create concept art. It’s just not all about the pretty little gadgets that you think makes it look cool. It’s aesthetic and its good design at the same time.

Anyway, here’s some pretty photos from the book to look at.

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Filed under Art, Artists, Concept Art, Games, Reviews